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John Godfrey accompanied by ..John Godfrey! Celebrating the release of Like Musical Instruments, a photo book collecting John Sarsgard’s portraits of poets along with their work, a cast of poets including Godfrey, Anselm Berrigan, & others read at St. Mark’s in the glow their likenesses. #poetryproject

John Godfrey accompanied by ..John Godfrey! Celebrating the release of Like Musical Instruments, a photo book collecting John Sarsgard’s portraits of poets along with their work, a cast of poets including Godfrey, Anselm Berrigan, & others read at St. Mark’s in the glow their likenesses. #poetryproject

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(Source: davidenos, via cedarmask)

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cedarmask:

Art by one my longest lasting inspirations in San Francisco. Filmmaker. Writer. All around genius, David Enos

cedarmask:

Art by one my longest lasting inspirations in San Francisco. Filmmaker. Writer. All around genius, David Enos

(Source: davidenos)

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cedarmask:

The Patio
I created eternity to bind you within it A scheme worthy of the pope to keep my prince
An ivory wall, have you seen it? there As we travel on the road, together’d shadows flit at twilight we will not be one of them vespers
Failing in confinement. I built it. Where are you?
John Wieners 6.22.69

cedarmask:

The Patio

I created eternity
to bind you within it
A scheme worthy of the pope
to keep my prince

An ivory wall, have you seen it? there
As we travel on the road, together’d
shadows flit at twilight
we will not be one of them vespers

Failing in confinement.
I built it. Where are you?

John Wieners 6.22.69

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That is, in fact, Anselm Berrigan in the distance—reading for the Washington Square lit journal launch party at Lillian Vernon Creative Writing House. Might I suggest you show up a little early to a Berrigan reading, lest you get into it with those scrappy NYU kids. #nosebleeds #anselmberrigan #washingtonsquare

That is, in fact, Anselm Berrigan in the distance—reading for the Washington Square lit journal launch party at Lillian Vernon Creative Writing House. Might I suggest you show up a little early to a Berrigan reading, lest you get into it with those scrappy NYU kids. #nosebleeds #anselmberrigan #washingtonsquare

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cedarmask:

A Diamond Necklace, Alice Notley. 1977, Frontward Books  Cover by Rochelle Kraut Published at The Poetry Project, New York City, in an edition of 350.
ON CLEARING THE RANGE
Thoroughbass its wake always a thought underdone Enter magic and invent numbers, a thorough actor one’s Dying year is a driving force a draught of stars
Bely power the elaborate tulip that closes upon  Entering its haft, new month, keeps its memory all Ruptured areas of glass like shattered chapters
Resist bright patrons modifiers, favor lowly dignifiers Interlunar coffees, the interstellar kindnesses Gently your brilliants draw childhood-true reflectiveness
From Arkansas’s and Tennessees of broadside types of you Nestling they broadcast their seams to your sky you lie Presently it turns truth, the promiscuous future
Is ours for a packet of Gods, proof light remains Of the events the bluish nights we take, in the bed’s Tranquil cupola, like the palm of a hand
A.N.

cedarmask:

A Diamond Necklace, Alice Notley. 1977, Frontward Books
Cover by Rochelle Kraut
Published at The Poetry Project, New York City, in an edition of 350.

ON CLEARING THE RANGE

Thoroughbass its wake always a thought underdone
Enter magic and invent numbers, a thorough actor one’s
Dying year is a driving force a draught of stars

Bely power the elaborate tulip that closes upon
Entering its haft, new month, keeps its memory all
Ruptured areas of glass like shattered chapters

Resist bright patrons modifiers, favor lowly dignifiers
Interlunar coffees, the interstellar kindnesses
Gently your brilliants draw childhood-true reflectiveness

From Arkansas’s and Tennessees of broadside types of you
Nestling they broadcast their seams to your sky you lie
Presently it turns truth, the promiscuous future

Is ours for a packet of Gods, proof light remains
Of the events the bluish nights we take, in the bed’s
Tranquil cupola, like the palm of a hand

A.N.

Text

Wave Poetry Tour 2014: New England - Pt. 2

Going way up there, following the little lines on the map about as far north as I had been since leaving the NW, I was itching to crack a few fresh spines—perhaps a little fresh seafood to complement—all the way to Portland. It’s not quite the cultural equivalent of its west coast sister yet, but all the tales of growth I’d heard—from foodies, artists, & the bookish alike—were proven fact. Still, considering how modestly sized the city is, I was pleased to see the “old guard” of Longfellow Books in Monument Square joined by a new branch of the Maine-based company, Sherman’s Books and Stationary, in the Old Port neighborhood. These stores both have two very different feels: Longfellow, with its proximity to an art school, had a great selection of about everything and textbooks and a lot of very helpful booksellers at the ready, meanwhile Sherman’s instantly apparent new-ness (seen on its shelves, below) is complemented by its small staff who run around like mad making sure everyone is getting exactly what they need. Neither serves lobster, but they provide perhaps the only thing better.Now, we’ve been through the part where I start going crazy, googly-eyed at the expanse of pavement I’ve been chasing down for A YEAR NOW. So you’ll understand if I took a little time to unwind, took a few odd jobs, took a stab at ‘normalcy’ or at least a few hours at the beach (to clarify: beach behavior is NOT normal behavior). Well I decided on a little pedestrian lifestyle in (I was in coastal Massachusetts, so duh…) Gloucester, MA. Little fishing town—big historical relevance, under the influence of Vincent Ferrini, Charles Olson, Gerrit Lansing, etc. And those are just the people who live(d) there! I posted up all casual-like—trying not to betray my giddiness in places like Eastern Point Lit House or The Gloucester Writers’ Center (in Vincent Ferrini’s residence!). But for those who think Gloucester’s literary lineage ended with Olson, there’s a multi-generational, bustling community that still acts as the literary hub of North Shore Mass. and is a part of the greater web of New England’s poetry resources.

But woe! summer began to clasp its shutters once more, and that spells trouble for me as far as New England weather goes. There were a couple places in Boston I knew demanded some reporting, so I wasn’t bailing before pulling into the harbor. I’ll be more specific, as Cambridge, MA is the place you’ll find Harvard Book Store. Ask any serious reader in New England and they’ll tell you the best place to find whatever you’re looking for is STILL—as in, since 1932—the corner bookstore in Harvard Square. It’s really hard to say anything to embellish the place, so I’ll just list it out to save myself the embarrassment: new, used, remainders, textbooks, author events virtually every day featuring poets to politicos, academics to activists. It’s not lazy, it’s the FACTS! Not every community has the privilege of having a number of major institutions nearby to prop up such a wonderful store, but Cambridge lucked out and continues to be home to one of the country’s best. I admit I’m prone to hyperbole every now and again, or at least some boyish flare. Let’s face it: Harvard just got one hell of a pitch without getting too personal. However, it’s not hyperbolizing to praise the collective efforts that have gone into sustaining an incredible store. I’m not juicing Harvard Books this time, but around the corner at the much smaller, much less-assuming Grolier Poetry. It’s a Wave Books partner store, to be sure, but also a place of legend and local reverence. It’s the oldest continuously run, almost-exclusively poetry-stocked shop in the country—pushing 90—and has only changed hands twice. It’s been home and incubator to so many poets, even an all-star list of its readings or endorsements would take up too much bandwidth here. For my part, it was a space small enough to feel like a reading nook surrounded by skyscrapers of poetry titles from the world over. A living temple. My visits were ushered by Elizabeth Doran, who always had a yarn to spin or a treat to offer. Tootsie Roll? Obscure poetries of Holland? No overstatements, no ornaments, just poems and their home in the past and future.I’m coming to grips with the end of a long, long tour. No time to shed any tears of nostalgia though—one tour’s end is another’s inception. Inevitably, New York awaits. But perhaps we should put this partiular romancing of the road to bed? Try a new format? We’ll return in the near future with the next phase of the Wave Poetry Tour. For now: thanks to all the wonderful booksellers in hollows high & low across this really huge country, to the accommodating of so many genuine surprise encounters, to all of you for reading. Here comes the big city, vague but unmistakable, in the window view… check back soon…

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cedarmask:

I made this watercolor of Ezra Pound, titled “A Pound Apparition” for Diane DiPrima’s 80th birthday party last month. She’s a Leo. I had attended her 75th birthday too and I remember that I gave her a smaller ink drawing of Flaubert. I had reached too far down on the line of his mustache and he looked suddenly sunk by this. Like a walrus feeling the weight of both tusks. The Pound portrait started out in graphite then I used a black colored pencil that became watercolor when I wet the tip. I love Diane’s life almost as much as her work. I have been reading from her larger North Atlantic Selected Poems lately. It includes more of her New York poems from the early to mid sixties. It’s definitely worth hunting for. It comes with a wonderful circular assemblage by George Herms gracing its cover. A tilted (welded?) paintbrush at the center of rusted hubcap. One of my favorite poetics statements of Diane’s is “The requirements of our life is the form of our art.”

cedarmask:

I made this watercolor of Ezra Pound, titled “A Pound Apparition” for Diane DiPrima’s 80th birthday party last month. She’s a Leo. I had attended her 75th birthday too and I remember that I gave her a smaller ink drawing of Flaubert. I had reached too far down on the line of his mustache and he looked suddenly sunk by this. Like a walrus feeling the weight of both tusks. The Pound portrait started out in graphite then I used a black colored pencil that became watercolor when I wet the tip. I love Diane’s life almost as much as her work. I have been reading from her larger North Atlantic Selected Poems lately. It includes more of her New York poems from the early to mid sixties. It’s definitely worth hunting for. It comes with a wonderful circular assemblage by George Herms gracing its cover. A tilted (welded?) paintbrush at the center of rusted hubcap. One of my favorite poetics statements of Diane’s is “The requirements of our life is the form of our art.”

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Rachel Zucker with an all-star cast on stage at the Brooklyn Book Festival. The panel on “Sex, Love, & Poetry” made the crowd squeal a little, feel a lot, & think about what it means to write on & through intimacy (among other things). #bkbf #thepededtrians

Rachel Zucker with an all-star cast on stage at the Brooklyn Book Festival. The panel on “Sex, Love, & Poetry” made the crowd squeal a little, feel a lot, & think about what it means to write on & through intimacy (among other things). #bkbf #thepededtrians

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Whispering to each other over the fence at Grolier Poetry in Cambridge. Founded in 1927 and also—wait for it—another Wave partner store. With this selection, display tables are coveted real estate. #wavepoetrytour #grolierpoetry

Whispering to each other over the fence at Grolier Poetry in Cambridge. Founded in 1927 and also—wait for it—another Wave partner store. With this selection, display tables are coveted real estate. #wavepoetrytour #grolierpoetry